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What Does a Breast Cancer Lump Feel Like?

A lump on the breast is the most well-known sign of breast cancer. But If you don’t know what your breast normally looks or feels like it can be hard to miss. On the other hand, your breast may feel normal but you can mistake this normalcy for a lump. So here is a blog on how breast cancer lump feels like because discovering early could save your life.


what does a breast cancer lump feel like

What is a breast cancer lump?

Breast cancer is a battle that 1 in 8 women is fighting worldwide. One of the tells of breast cancer is a lump on the breast or armpit area.


A breast lump is a mass or thickening that you can feel in your breast tissue. It could be benign (non-cancerous) or malignant (cancerous). If a lump or other change in the breast is found, it is important to see a doctor to determine the cause.


What is the typical size and texture of a breast cancer lump?

The size and texture of a breast cancer lump can vary. It can feel hard or firm, and it can have uneven edges. In some cases, breast cancer lumps can even be soft and rounded. The size of a breast cancer lump can change from person to person. While it can be small, like a pea, it can even be larger, like a golf ball.


breast cancer symptoms

What else should you look for when you notice a breast lump?

When it comes to breast health, it is important to be aware of any changes in your breasts, including the presence of a lump. Because as you know early detection saves lives.


When breast cancer is found early, there are more effective ways to treat it, and a better chance that the person will live. Early detection also makes it possible to use less invasive treatments like breast-conserving surgery, which can have better cosmetic results and a lower risk of problems.


Skin changes

One of the things you should be mindful of in your breasts is skin changes. They can be the tell of breast cancer. Here is what they are:

  • Dimpling or puckering of the skin

  • A rash or redness on the breast

  • A change in the size or shape of the breast

  • A change in the color of the breast (such as redness or darkening)

Just because you have changes in your skin it doesn’t mean that you have cancer. So don’t panic immediately. It can be eczema or allergies causing the changes in your skin.


Pain

Pain caused by breast cancer is rare but possible. So If you are feeling pain in your breast you must consult your doctor immediately even if it isn’t cancer it could be a clogged milk duct, a cyst, or an ingrown hair.


Shape and size of a breast lump

Breast lumps can be of different sizes and shapes. They can be round or oval, and as small as a pea or as big as a golf ball. Some lumps are smooth and firm, while others are soft and spongey. Some lumps are stuck to the tissue around them, but others can be moved.


A lump in the breast that is hard has uneven edges, and is stuck to the tissue around it may be a sign of breast cancer more than a lump that is soft, round, and moves.

It is important to remember that a breast lump's shape, size, and feel do not always show whether it is cancerous or not. A biopsy is the only way to be sure of the diagnosis.


Nipple changes

Another symptom of breast cancer is nipple changes. Changes in your nipples are usually pretty obvious but let’s see what they are to be mindful of them:

  • Nipple discharge

  • Inverted nipple: When the nipple turns inward instead of pointing outward.

  • Scaling, crusting, or ulceration of the skin on the nipple or areola.

  • Nipple pain or tenderness.

  • Change in the position of the nipple, such as pointing in a different direction.


breast cancer breast lump

Can you have breast cancer without a lump?

Yes, you can have breast cancer without having a lump. In fact, breast cancer can show up in many different ways, such as a lump or a change in the shape or size of the breast, a change in the skin or nipples, or even a discharge from the nipples. So the best course of action would be to get regular mammograms and do self-exams once a month.


More than 93% of women who were diagnosed early